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Posts from the ‘Pain’ Category

New York Times: Acupuncture Can Ease Wrist Pain In Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

The New York Times has highlighted some interesting research findings which illustrate some of the benefits of acupuncture for wrist pain.  In the study, which included 80 participants with mild to moderate wrist pain.  Using MRI and nerve conduction tests, the researchers studied the effects of acupuncture on the brain and nerves.

The group of patients receiving the acupuncture treatment had measureable physiological improvements in pain centres in the brain and nerves.

Vitaly Napadow, the senior author of the study and a researcher at Harvard said:

“What’s really interesting here is that we’re evaluating acupuncture using objective outcomes.  Sham acupuncture was good at relieving pain temporarily, but true acupuncture had objective physiological — and enduring — effects.  Acupuncture is a safe, low-risk, low side-effect intervention.  It’s perfect for a first-line approach, and it’s something patients should consider before trying more invasive procedures like surgery.”

 The full study was published in the Journal of Neurology -Brain.  Read more from the journal here.

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in the Ribble Valley, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from Preston, Blackburn, Blackpool, Garstang, Lancaster, Leyland, Chorley, East Lancashire and throughout Lancashire.

Acupuncture in the News for treating Back Pain

Acupuncture has once again received some positive reports in the media – this time for the treatment of back pain. Physiotherapists suggest that as many as 8 out of 10 of us will suffer with back pain at some point in our lives and acupuncture offers an effective treatment option, supported by the NHS. To read more on this article, published in the Women Feel Good series please follow the link here.

If you would like to discuss having acupuncture please get in touch by telephoning me on 07866 418564 or send me a message from my Contact Me Page.

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in Preston, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from Leyland, Chorley, East Lancashire, the Ribble Valley, Blackburn and throughout Lancashire.

Acupuncture & Arthritis

A new report by Arthritis Research UK published in January 2013, found that acupuncture was one of the most effective treatments for osteoarthritis, lower back pain and fibromyalgia.

The report also concluded that acupuncture was one of the most studied and effective complementary medicines in the area of musculoskeletal disease.

We hope that the findings of this study will give patients greater confidence, when making the decision to choose acupuncture for the treatment of osteoarthritis, lower back pain and fibromyalgia.

If you are considering acupuncture and would like to find out more please do get in touch by calling 07866 418564 or filling in the form on my Contact Me page.

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in Preston, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from throughout Lancashire.

Acupuncture & Headaches

Information released by NICE (National institute of Health and Clinical Excellence) today reported that medication overuse is one of the commonest causes of headaches affecting around one in 50 people.  Women are five times more likely to suffer from these.

NICE conclude that acupuncture is the only proven method to prevent tension-type headaches and migraine.

These findings are great news for patients considering acupuncture, and really show the importance of acupuncture in managing and preventing these types of pain.

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in Preston, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from throughout Lancashire.

Acupuncture & Managing Pain

Scientists from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre in New York studied 29 separate investigations involving 18,000 patients and they found evidence to support the use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain.  One theory suggests that acupuncture works by releasing the bodies own natural pain killers such as adenosine.

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in Preston, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from throughout Lancashire.

Acupuncture for Lower Back Pain

Back pain can affect anyone at any age and most people will suffer from it at some point in their lives. It is the UK’s leading cause of disability and one of the main reasons for work-related sickness absence.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines on best practice now recommend a course of 10 sessions of acupuncture as a first line treatment for persistent, non-specific low back pain.

Research shows that acupuncture provides pain relief (Pomeranz 1987; Zhao, 2008) reduces inflammation (Kim 2008, Kavoussi 2007; Zijlstra 2003) and improves muscle stiffness and joint mobility.

In the link here plumber Stephen Morris talks about his personal experience of acupuncture for his lower back pain.

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in Preston, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from throughout Lancashire.  If you would like to know how acupuncture may be helpful to you, please contact her.

Acupuncture & Tennis Elbow

A study published in 2005 compared electro-acupuncture plus moxibustion with steroid and lidocaine medication for the treatment of tennis elbow, and found the acupuncture treatment to be more effective.(Jiang 2005).

It is thought that acupuncture may help relieve symptoms of tennis elbow, such as pain and inflammation by:

  • stimulating nerves located in muscles and other tissues, which leads to release of endorphins and other neurohumoral factors, and changes the processing of pain in the brain and spinal cord (Pomeranz 1987, Han 2004, Zhao 2008, Zhou 2008, Lee 2009, Cheng 2009)
  • delivering analgesia (Koo 2008);
  • increasing the release of adenosine (Goldman 2010);
  • modulating the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (Hui 2009);
  • reducing inflammation  (Kavoussi 2007, Zijlstra 2003);
  • improving muscle stiffness and joint mobility by increasing local microcirculation (Komori 2009), which aids dispersal of swelling.

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in Preston, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from throughout Lancashire.

 

Acupuncture & Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Research published in The Journal of Pain looked at the use of acupuncture in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.  Patients received 8 sessions of acupuncture over a four-week period, and their progress was then monitored for over 12 months.

Over 80% of the patients who received acupuncture showed good improvement which was maintained over the 12 month monitoring period.  This improvement was significantly better than that seen in the group who received an oral steroid.  The researchers concluded that acupuncture should be considered as an alternative treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome.

Source:  Journal of Pain, February 2011; 12(2):272-9

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in Preston, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from throughout Lancashire.

Acupuncture Pain Molecule Pinpointed

The BBC Health Reporter, Emma Wilkinson wrote an interesting article last year, reporting that the molecule which may control how acupuncture relieves pain has been pinpointed by US researchers.

Experiments showed that levels of adenosine – a natural painkiller – increased in tissues near acupuncture sites, and pain experts said the findings may partly explain how the treatment works.

Adenosine is known to have many roles in the body including regulating sleep and reducing inflammation.  Other research has shown that it becomes active in the skin after an injury to act as a local painkiller.

The research team found that during and immediately after an acupuncture treatment, the level of adenosine in the tissues near the needles was 24 times greater than before the treatment, the researchers said.

Then using a drug which extends the effects of adenosine, they found that the benefits of acupuncture lasted three times as long.

Study leader Dr Maiken Nedergaard, a neuroscientist at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said: “Acupuncture has been a mainstay of medical treatment in certain parts of the world for 4,000 years, but because it has not been understood completely, many people have remained skeptical.

“In this work, we provide information about one physical mechanism through which acupuncture reduces pain in the body,” she added.

A spokesman from the British Pain Society said: “We have known for a long time that acupuncture alters the response to pain by modulation of some of the pain pathways in the spinal cord, and also by the release of endorphins.

“It is very interesting that scientists have found an alteration in the tissue levels of adenosine, which helps to explain some of the modulatory effects of acupuncture on pain perception.”

Charlotte Green practices acupuncture in Preston, and her clinic is conveniently located for patients travelling from throughout Lancashire.